Summer 2009 Course Descriptions

Summer I

Phil 1306 (F1) Introduction to Logic

Stuart Rosenbaum

MH 105 09:45-11:15 MTWRF

This course is designed to cover basics of logic that might be useful to students. Many students who want to pursue further professional studies take standard national exams like the GRE, LSAT, GMAT, or MCAT. Many students believe this logic course helps on those kinds of exams, and I intend the course to cover materials with that explicit goal in mind. Assessing the quality of reasoning about specific issues is one primary aim of the course, and one tool for making these assessments appears on our course outline as “informal fallacies.” In addition, much of the course is devoted to techniques of formal reasoning and to standard kinds of terminology for evaluating it; these techniques and terminology are also useful in larger contexts. The text for the course is Hurley’s A Concise Introduction to Logic.

Phil 1308 (F1) Introductory Topics in Ethics

Stuart Rosenbaum

MH 105 11:30-1:00 MTWRF

Kevin Rudd, the newly elected Labor Prime Minister of Australia, as his first official act in office issued a formal apology to Australia’s indigenous peoples for the long-standing abuse they endured through policies of the Australian government. Many thought his apology opened the way for payment of reparations to those who had been abused through those official government policies. A similar issue has been simmering in America. This course investigates some of the historical background and some of the moral context useful in addressing the issue of the legitimacy of reparations or apologies to African-American citizens for their historical abuse in official policy of the American government. Does payment of reparations to African-American citizens make sense given our common history? Does payment of reparations make moral sense given our best moral thinking?


Summer II

Phil 1306 (S1) Introduction to Logic

Todd Buras

MH 105 09:45-11:15 MTWRF

Reasoning is about following connections between truths. It is an inescapable part of life. We all reason all the time. The question is not whether you will reason, but whether you will reason well. Logic is the art of reasoning well. This course introduces logic by: (i) examining the basic patterns of good reasoning, (ii) identifying what makes these patterns good, and (iii) applying these patterns to evaluate ordinary reasoning.

Phil 1321 1B Introductory Topics in Philosophy (Baylor in Oxford)

Stuart Rosenbaum

Phil 3305 1B British Philosophy (Baylor in Oxford)

Stuart Rosenbaum

Phil 4325 Literary and Philosophical Perspectives on Medicine (Baylor in Great Britain)

James Marcum

Phil 4300 History of Medicine (Baylor in Great Britain) (Cross-listed with MH 4300 and HIS 4300)

James Marcum

Why is medicine, especially within the western, industrialized countries, practiced today as it is? The answer to this question is explored from not only an historical perspective but also from a philosophical perspective. To that end, we explore the rise of modern medicine beginning with the Greek Hippocrates and continuing to today. Along the way, we discuss the major personages, institutions, ideas, and events that have shaped modern medical knowledge and practice.

Phil 5330.01 Readings in Ancient/Medieval Philosophy

Robert Roberts

Phil 5331.01 Readings in Modern/Contemporary Philosophy

Todd Buras