Baylor > Philosophy > Graduate Program > Graduate Courses
More...
Want to read what the professors say about the courses they're teaching? Read about the Current Courses being taught this semester

Graduate Courses

*4310 Philosophy of Science
An analysis of philosophical problems about science. Such central concepts as law, causation, induction, hypothesis, theory, verification, and models are studied. Presuppositions and methodologies of different sciences may be examined. The relation of scientific views to moral, social, and metaphysical problems is considered.

4311 Epistemology
A critical examination of classical and current problems in theories of knowledge. Attention is given to such problems as meaning, truth, the knowing situation, universals, knowledge of the external world and of other minds, and validation of knowledge claims. The contributions of recent movements such as logical empiricism, linguistic analysis, and phenomenology may be studied.

4314 History of Philosophy: Patristic and Medieval
The history and development of philosophy from 250 to 1400 A.D. Some of the major philosophers studied include Augustine, Boethius, John Scotus Erigena, Anselm, Abelard, Avicenna, Averroes, Maimonides, Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. Special emphasis will be placed on the significance of pre-Enlightenment thinkers to the development of the Enlightenment and Modernity.

4318 Philosophy of Law (Cross-listed as AMS 4318)
A critical study of historical and contemporary approaches to primary issues in the philosophy of law. Movements studied in the course usually include legal positivism, legal absolutism, legal relativism, legal realism, and natural law. Some legal philosophers whose works generally are discussed include John Austin, Jeremy Bentham, H. L. A. Hart, Hans Kelsen, John Rawls, R. Dworkin, M. R. Cohen, O. W. Holmes, Cicero, and Thomas Aquinas.

4319 Philosophical Writing, Research and Oral Presentation
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above. Enhancing philosophical writing skills, promoting proficiency with new computer research technologies, and refining oral communication skills.

4320 The Philosophy of Religion
A philosophical inquiry into such topics as the existence and nature of God, religious experience, immortality, the problem of evil, the relationship between reason and faith, the meaning of religious language and symbols, and the validity of religious knowledge claims. Methods of contemporary philosophical analysis are used in clarifying religious concepts.

4321 Metaphysics
A critical analysis of classical and contemporary metaphysical systems and problems. These include the world views found in the philosophies of naturalism, idealism, personalism, positivism, pragmatism, organicism, and existentialism. Problem areas considered are mind-body relations, cosmology, ontology, philosophical anthropology, universals, determinism, and freedom. Basic categories such substance, cause, time, space, matter, and form are critically examined. Attention also is focused upon methods and criteria employed in metaphysical study.

4324 Philosophy in Literature
A critical study of philosophical material in literature, that is, a study of the philosophy to be found in essays, novels, poems, and plays. Among the authors usually studied are Plato, Aristotle, Theophrastus, Lucretius, Voltaire, Goethe, Ibsen, Nietzsche, Kafka, Camus, Sartre, Malraux, and Hesse, as well as selected contemporary novelists.

4331 Latin American Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): Upper-level standing.
Philosophical and intellectual movements in Latin America from the colonial times to the present. These movements include scholasticism, eclecticism, utilitarianism, romanticism, positivism, vitalism, phenomenology, and existentialism and philosophies of liberation. Works of major representatives of these movements (including such individuals as Bello, Mora, Sierra, Varona, Deustua, Caso, Korn, Vasconcelos, Farias Brito, Vaz Ferreira, and Romero) are studied.

4340 East Asian Philosophy (Cross-listed as AST 4340)
An historical and critical survey of the major movements in Chinese, Indian, or Japanese philosophy. Course may be repeated once with different area of concentration.

4341 Contemporary Continental Philosophy
A critical study of philosophical movements in Europe during the past one hundred and fifty years. Some of the major philosophers studied include Nietzsche, Husserl, Adorno, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Wittgenstein, Russell, Carnap, Gadamer, Habermas, Lyotard, Foucault, and Derrida. Movements studied include phenomenology, positivism, naturalism, critical theory, existentialism, structuralism, deconstructionism, and post modernism. Course may be repeated once with a different area of concentration.

4342 Contemporary American Philosophy (Cross-listed as AMS 4342)
A critical study of philosophical movements in the United States during the past one hundred years. Some of the philosophers whose works are studied include Pierce, James, Royce, Dewey, Mead,Lewis, Santayana, Whitehead, and Quine. Recent movements such as critical realism, naturalism, humanism, personalism, logical positivism, and linguistic analysis are also studied.

4345 Intermediate Logic
Prerequisite(s): Upper-level standing.
The language of first-order logic as a formal deductive system.

4353 Philosophy of Language
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.
Critical examination of the basic problems in general semantics and philosophy of language, giving special attention to the major authors in these fields.

4360 Contemporary Ethical Theory
Critical study of major problems discussed in contemporary ethical writings. Attention is given to such issues as the subject matter and methodology of contemporary ethical inquiry, the justification of ethical beliefs, theories of intrinsic value, theories of right action, the generalization principle, and the problem of freedom, determinism, and moral responsibility. Philosophers whose works may be considered include G.E. Moore, Ross, Stevenson, Hare, Toulmin, Perry, Dewey, Baier, Brandt, Rawls, and MacIntyre.

4361 Social Philosophy
A critical survey of the fundamental concepts and theories used in justifying social institutions. Problems such as authority, law, freedom, rights, equality, responsibility, power, justice, the state, and justification of open societies are considered.

4365 Jewish Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): Upper-level standing or consent of instructor. Jewish philosophy in the twentieth century, with emphasis on the relation between mortality and morality, justice and totalitarianism, faith after the Holocaust, and individualism and revolution.

4379 Islam and Democracy (Cross-listed as CHS 4379 and PSC 4379)
Examines the evolution of political philosophy and institutions in Muslim culture.

4V99 Special Topics in Philosophy (Cross-listed as AMS 4V99) 1 to 3 sem. hrs.
Prerequisite(s): Senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor. Research projects to be undertaken by students or by classes under the direct supervision of the professor. Course may be repeated once with a different topic of study.

5310 Value Theory
A seminar on the major interpretations of the nature and meaning of value, with particular attention to the relation between value theory and ethics. Course may be repeated once with a different topic of study.

5311 Readings from the Philosophers (Cross-listed as PSC 5311)
An intensive, critical reading of selected works of major philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Russell, and Rawls. Other philosophers may be added to this list. May be taken a maximum of six times if different topic, not to exceed eighteen semester hours.

5312 Topics in Classical Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): Admission to graduate programs of Baylor University or consent of instructor. A critical study of philosophers from the classical world; may include figures from the presocratic origins of philosophy to the times of epicurean and stoic philosophers, including especially Plato and Aristotle. May be repeated twice for different topics.

5314 Topics in Modern Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): Admission to graduate program of Baylor University or consent of instructor. A critical study of philosophers from the Modern Period, including thinkers from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries. May be repeated twice if different topics.

5316 Contemporary Philosophical Problems
Examination of historical, normative, and analytical problems which have arisen in the history of philosophy and an examination of the systems of philosophy which have emerged from the consideration of these problems. May be taken six times if different topic, not to exceed eighteen semester hours.

5320 Special Topics in Philosophy
Special research topics to be undertaken by students under direct supervision of the professor. Course may be taken a maximum of four times if different topic, not to exceed twelve hours.

5330 Readings in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): Fifteen hours of graduate credit in philosophy.
A critical readings course on primary sources and ancient and medieval philosophy. The course concludes with a comprehensive written examination over the sources. Course may be taken twice for a maximum of six semester hours.

5331 Readings in Modern and Contemporary Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): Fifteen hours of graduate credit in philosophy.
A critical readings course on primary sources in modern and contemporary philosophy. The course concludes with a comprehensive written examination over the sources.

5333 Seminar in Political Philosophy (Cross-listed as PSC 5333)
Select topics and issues in contemporary political theory developed and explored with an emphasis on the seminal writings of original thinkers and on the contemporary debates surrounding these writings. Possible themes of this course include postmodern political thought, neo-Kantian and neo-Hegelian political theory, contemporary liberal and communitarian thought, theories of justice, and contemporary relevance of ancient political philosophy.

5338 Seminar on the History of Church and State in the West (Cross-listed as CHS 5338, HIS 5338, and REL 5338)
A survey of church-state relations in modern Europe from 1648 to the present. Particular attention is paid to European separationist models, including laicite, secularism and belief in Europe today, and the increasing significance of Islam.

5342 Seminar on Religion, Law, and Politics (Cross-listed as CHS 5342, PSC 5342, and REL 5340)
A historical examination of liberal and republican traditions of government and their relationship to church-state relations, with particular emphasis on the influence of both traditions on the American constitutional system. Special attention is given to communitarianism and individualism, especially in their treatment of religion as competing systems in rights-based liberal democracies.

5343 Classical Political Thought (Cross-listed as PSC 5343)
Study of selected major texts in classical (Greek and Roman) political thought, with an emphasis on the origin of political philosophy in the thought of Socrates and its development in the works of Plato and Aristotle. This course may be repeated, for a maximum of nine credit hours, when content differs.

5350 Workshop in Teaching Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): Consent of director of graduate studies in philosophy.
This course will address a broad range of pedagogical issues involved in becoming a successful philosophy teacher. Topics include: educational theory, organizational strategies, practical techniques for effective lecturing, practical techniques for stimulating discussion, the logistics of evaluation, the scholarship of teaching and the importance of ongoing self-assessment of classroom performance.

5353 Medieval Political Thought (Cross-listed as PSC 5353)
Study of the selected major texts in medieval political thought, with an emphasis on either major thinker(s) or theme(s). Themes may include nature and grace, politics and salvation, theology and practical wisdom. This course may be repeated, for a maximum of nine credit hours, when content differs.

5360 Topics in Contemporary Ethical Theory
Prerequisite(s): Admission to graduate programs of Baylor University or consent of instructor.
A critical study of issues in contemporary ethical theory; may be repeated twice with different topics of study.

5361 Contemporary Philosophy of Religion
Prerequisite(s): Graduate status or consent of instructor. This course investigates issues in contemporary philosophy of religion.

5362 Issues in Contemporary Philosophy of Science
Prerequisite(s): Admission to Philosophy Ph.D. program. A critical study of issues in contemporary philosophy of sciences; may be repeated twice with different topics of study.

5363 Modern Political Thought (Cross-listed as PSC 5363)
Study of selected major texts in modern political thought, from Machiavelli to Nietzsche. This course may be repeated, for a maximum of nine credit hours, when content differs.

5365 Philosophy of Language
A critical study of issues in philosophy of language. Meaning, reference, intentionality and extensionality are among the issues to be considered using primary sources in contemporary philosophy.

5393 Advanced Seminar in Political Philosophy (Cross-listed as PSC 5393)
Prerequisite(s): PSC 5343, 5353, or 5363; or the equivalent, with the consent of the Graduate Director. Concentrated study of major thinkers or texts in the history of political philosophy. This course may be taken more than once, for a maximum of nine credit hours, when content differs.

5V99 Thesis 1 to 6 sem. hrs.

6V10 Prospectus Research
Prerequisite(s): PHI 5330 and 5331; and completion of regular course work.
Supervised research for developing and writing a Dissertation Prospectus Proposal that will be the subject of a preliminary exam that will admit students to candidacy. A student may repeat this course for credit, with a maximum of eighteen total hours.

6V99 Dissertation 1 to 12 sem. hrs.
Supervised research for the doctoral dissertation.

*Note that 4000 level courses are upper-level undergraduate courses. Both graduate students and undergraduate students enroll in these courses. Graduate students taking these courses are required to do some extra work on top of what is assigned to undergraduate students.