Baylor in the News

In the Spotlight

6/30/2015
AUDIO LINK INCLUDED: Lori Baker, Ph.D., associate professor of anthropology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, is interviewed for this radio documentary that takes listeners to the desert ranch lands of Brooks County and the border town of Reynosa, Tamaulipas. Baker’s part of the documentary runs from 12:14-16:53. Baker is the founder of the “Reuniting Families Project,- which helps recover and identify the remains of unnamed individuals who died while attempting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border. (Tonya Lewis, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers faculty and research in the anthropology department. She has pitched Dr. Baker’s work nationally to media since 2012.)

Research

6/30/2015
June 29, 2015
Congregation size has an impact on how people view the reasons for racial inequality in America, according to a new study by researchers at Baylor University and the University of Southern California. Those who attend very large congregations do not tend to attribute social divisions between blacks and whites to discrimination, but to something other than structural failings in society. Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., and Jerry Z. Park, Ph.D., associate professors of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, co-authored "Congregational Size and Attitudes toward Racial Inequality among Church Attendees in America," published in the journal Religions. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
6/30/2015
June 29, 2015
This article mentions a 2013 Baylor study of 389 U.S. congregations that had attracted and retained people from diverse races and ethnic groups. But even in churches with a nearly perfect three-way ethnic split " with the largest racial group making up 35 percent of the congregation " members of “out-groups- felt they didn’t belong. The study was led by sociologist Brandon C. Martinez, a doctoral candidate in the College of Arts & Sciences, and published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched the story about the study to national media outlets when it was released. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
6/30/2015
June 27, 2015
If you feel thankful and grateful in general, you're more likely to experience happiness than people who are more focused on their material wealth and possessions, according to a recent study led by James A. Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. But when people who are more materialistic have an experience that causes them to feel gratitude in some form, their level of happiness rises. The research was published in The Journal of Positive Psychology. (Eric Eckert, Baylor Media Communications specialist, covers Hankamer research and faculty.)

Faculty in the News

6/30/2015
June 26, 2015
Alan Jacobs, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Humanities in the Honors Program in Baylor’s Honors College, reacts to a story in The New York Times about a report indicating that people with more money are generally happy but that happiness should not be confused with contentment, satisfaction or achievement. The report also found that satisfaction rose with wealth, and 85 percent of those with over $5 million reported that they were “highly satisfied- " despite jobs that often entail long hours and high pressure. Asks Jacobs: “What good is that happiness if the millionaires who have it cannot enjoy the freedom the money gives them, the freedom that most people would love to have? . . .My takeaway from reading this article: no one involved, from the investigators to the respondents to the reporter, has any idea what they mean by •happy’ or •satisfied’ or •content’ or •free.’-
6/30/2015
June 25, 2015
“Baptists in America: A History,- a book by Barry Hankins, Ph.D., professor of history and director of graduate studies, and Thomas Kidd, Ph.D., associate director of the Institute for Studies of Religion and co-director of the Program on Historical Studies of Religion, is reviewed by Pastor Steve Weaver. Weaver writes that in their book, Kidd and Hankins show how American Baptists have functioned alternatively as outsiders and insiders in American culture. “Tracing Baptists from their beginning in the new world as a persecuted minority all the way to their late 20th-century prominence in the culture wars, Kidd and Hankins demonstrate that individual Baptists have often enjoyed acceptance while others have been maligned. It is a compelling narrative expertly told.-

Students

6/30/2015
June 27, 2015
Article on the skyrocketing development of Baylor sophomore track student-athlete Trayvon Bromell, who will represent the U.S. in the 100 meters at the World Championships. "I'm just impressed with the perspective he has on the sport and how young he is," Baylor head track coach Todd Harbour said. "He wasn't this phenom when he was a freshman. He had injuries. That helped shape him, build his character, to have to go through some real tough injuries. So success didn't come easy. He had to work for it. But he remembers the days when he was back there. It keeps him pretty level."

Alumni

6/30/2015
July 1, 2015
Baylor alumnus Michael Jenkins, the president and managing director of Dallas Summer Musicals (DSM) and president and founder of Leisure and Recreation Concepts Inc. (LARC), is described as the Walt Disney of Dallas by D Magazine. Jenkins began his career by investing $5,000 in the first national tour of “My Fair Lady- at age 17. With the money he made from the investment, he was able to pay his way through Baylor. During his career Jenkins co-produced several Tony Award-winning plays on Broadway and grew the DSM’s annual attendance to 500,000.
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