Baylor in the News

In the Spotlight

10/21/2014
Oct. 16, 2014
Media accounts of religion’s demise are inaccurate, reports Byron Johnson, Ph.D., co-director of Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion, who is quoted in this story. Close examination of data from the General Social Survey, Baylor Religion Survey and other data sources show that across 40 years, church attendance has varied only slightly, Johnson wrote in The Heritage Foundation’s recently published 2014 Index of Culture and Opportunity: The Social and Economic Trends that Shape America. Johnson has written that close examination of the data reveal as misleading media reports suggesting that millennials are leaving the faith of their parents; that young people under 30 are deserting the church; that women are rapidly falling away from religion; and that those without religious affiliations have doubled in recent decades.(Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in the Institute and pitched this story in September.)

Research

10/21/2014
Oct. 21, 2014
Memory decline " a frequent complaint of menopausal women " potentially could be lessened by hypnotic relaxation therapy, say Baylor University researchers, who already have done studies showing that such therapy eases hot flashes, improves sleep and reduces stress in menopausal women. Quoted in a review published in the journal Integrative Medicine Insights are Jim R. Sliwinski, a doctoral student in the department of psychology and neuroscience in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences; and Gary Elkin’s, Ph.D., director of Baylor’s Mind-Body Medicine Research Laboratory and a professor of psychology and neuroscience. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers faculty and research in psychology and neuroscience and pitched this story.)
10/21/2014
Oct. 20, 2014
Ospreys do not carry significant amounts of human pharmaceutical chemicals, despite widespread occurrence of these chemicals in water, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Baylor University research. The finding, published by Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, is the first published study that examines the bioaccumulation of pharmaceuticals in the water-fish-osprey food web. Fish exhibit abnormal behavior and lower levels of anxiety when exposed to drugs used to treat depression and other disorders. A 2012 study by Baylor University researchers found that human data for drug activity can be used to predict surface water concentrations of antidepressants that negatively impact fish behavior. That study was done by Bryan Brooks, Ph.D., professor of environmental science in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Tonya Lewis, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in environmental sciences.)
10/21/2014
Oct. 17, 2014
Matthew S. Stanford, Ph.D., professor of psychology and neuroscience in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, is quoted in this article about churches and their struggles to assist people living with mental illness. The article references a Baylor study of 70 seminaries, led by Stanford, which found that seminaries do little to train ministers to recognize mental illness and refer individuals to a doctor or psychologist. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers psychology and neuroscience faculty and research and pitched the original study in September to national media.)

Baylor in the News

10/21/2014
Oct. 17, 2014
Baylor University’s entrepreneurship program was recently ranked as third best in the nation by Forbes. Baylor came in behind Babson College and The University of Houston. The schools were ranked based on how well offered courses prepare students to become successful entrepreneurs. (Eric Eckert, Baylor Media Communications specialist, covers research, faculty and programs in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business.)

Faculty in the News

10/21/2014
Oct. 20, 2014
Although few of Texas' 36 congressional races are considered to be seriously competitive, that hasn't stopped lawmakers from raking in serious campaign cash, according to a report by The Dallas Morning News that quotes Patrick Flavin, Ph.D., assistant professor of political science in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. The fund-raising helps build party loyalty, Flavin said. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, who covers faculty and research in political science, arranged the interview with Flavin. The story was picked up by The Associated Press and ran in other media outlets.)
10/21/2014
Oct. 18, 2014
Although progressive people hope to return to the “good old days,- which would make life brutal, banal and brief, Rodney Stark, Ph.D., co-director of Baylor’s Institute for Studies of Religion and Distinguished Professor of the Social Sciences, disagrees. In his latest book, “How the West Won: The Neglected Story of the Triumph of Modernity,- he writes that Western modernity is far better than its alternatives because of its fundamental commitment to freedom, reason and human dignity. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty at Baylor’s Institute for Studies of Religion.)

Alumni

10/21/2014
Oct. 20, 2014
Gov. Rick Perry has reappointed attorney Elizabeth “Christy- Jack, B.A. ’88, of Fort Worth to the Governing Board of the Office of Violent Sex Offender Management. Jack is deputy chief of the Tarrant County District Attorney’s Office.
10/21/2014
Oct. 20, 2014
Soprano Kiri Deonarine, B.M.E. ’07, will sing in New York’s Metropolitan Opera as Frasquita in this season’s performance of “Carmen.-

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