Baylor University Poage Library

A Message to Garcia


"A Message to Garcia" was a document that inspired Bob Bullock. It was required reading for staffers.

Elbert Hubbard

Elbert Green Hubbard b. June 19, 1856, Bloomington, Ill., U.S. d. May 7, 1915. Hubbard was an American editor, publisher, and author of the moralistic essay "A Message to Garcia" of which over 40 million copies have been printed.

Elbert Green Hubbard

A freelance newspaperman and head of sales and advertising for a manufacturing company, Hubbard retired in 1892 and founded his Roycroft Press in 1893 at East Aurora, N.Y., on the model of William Morris' communal Kelmscott Press, which he had visited in England. Beginning in 1895 he issued monthly the famous "Little Journey" booklets. These were pleasant biographical essays on famous persons, in which fact was interwoven with comment and satire. Hubbard also began publishing The Philistine, an avant-garde magazine, which he ultimately wrote single-handedly. In an 1899 number of The Philistine, "A Message to Garcia" appeared, in which the importance of perseverance was drawn as a moral from a Spanish-American War incident. In 1908 Hubbard began to edit and publish a second monthly, The Fra. His printing establishment in time expanded to include furniture and leather shops, a smithy, and an art school, as had the operations of William Morris. Hubbard died in the sinking of the ocean liner Lusitania.

Hubbard's writings contain a bizarre mixture of radicalism and conservatism. He apotheosized work and efficiency in a vigorous, epigrammatic style. Valuable collections of his writings are Little Journeys, 14 vol. (1915), and Selected Writings, 14 vol. (1923). His Scrap Book (1923) and Note Book (1927) were published posthumously.

"Elbert Hubbard." Encyclopedia Britannica. 2004. Encyclopedia Britannica Online. 21 May 2004 .

A Message To Garcia

In all this Cuban business there is one man stands out on the horizon of my memory like Mars at perihelion. When war broke out between Spain & the United States, it was very necessary to communicate quickly with the leader of the Insurgents. Garcia was somewhere in the mountain vastness of Cuba- no one knew where. No mail nor telegraph message could reach him. The President must secure his cooperation, and quickly.

What to do!

Some one said to the President, "There's a fellow by the name of Rowan will find Garcia for you, if anybody can." Continue to full text...

View Baylor University's Copy of "A Message To Garcia"


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