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Rangers eliminated

Nov. 2, 2010

By Ben Walker
Associated Press

ARLINGTON -- The prize that eluded Willie and Barry at long last belongs to the San Francisco Giants, thanks to a band of self-described castoffs and misfits and their shaggy-haired ace.

The Giants won the World Series on Monday night, beating the Texas Rangers 3-1 in a tense Game 5 and taking the trophy home to the city by the Bay for the first time.

It was an overdue victory -- the Giants last wore the crown in 1954, four years before they moved west.

So much for a franchise that never quite got it done in October despite the likes of baseball giants Willie Mays, Barry Bonds and Juan Marichal. It's November, and now new names stand tall in San Francisco.

Tim Lincecum outdueled Cliff Lee in an every-pitch-matters matchup that was scoreless until Edgar Renteria hit a stunning three-run homer with two outs in the seventh inning. Nelson Cruz homered in the bottom half, but Lincecum returned to his wicked self and preserved the lead.

Lincecum won this game of Texas Hold 'em, beating Lee for the second time in a week. The two-time NL Cy Young winner gave up three hits over eight innings and struck out 10.

Manager Bruce Bochy enjoys calling his Giants a ragtag bunch. But the foundation of this club -- for now, for the foreseeable future -- is totally home grown, built on a deep, talented and young rotation, a rookie catcher with huge star potential and their bearded closer.

Renteria reprised his role of postseason star. His 11th-inning single ended Game 7 of the 1997 World Series and lifted Florida over Cleveland. Forget that he made the last out in the 2004 Series that finished Boston's sweep of St. Louis -- this journeyman's path led to another title, helped by his go-ahead home run in Game 2.

A team seemingly free of egos did everything right to take the lead. Ross, the surprising MVP of the NL championship series, stayed square and hit a leadoff single and Juan Uribe followed with another hit up the middle.

That put a runner at second base for the first time in the game and brought up Huff, who led the Giants in home runs this year. So what did he do? He expertly put down the first sacrifice bunt of his career.

Lee struck out Pat Burrell to keep the runners put, but Ross began hopping home as soon as Renteria connected, sending a drive that kept sailing and landed over the left-center field wall.

And just like that, all the Giants' past troubles seemed like ancient history.