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Art museum exhibits exploration results

Jan. 21, 1997

By Matthew Lester

Lariat Reporter

The fire-light dances across the canvas of 'The Burning of Paris.' The gargoyles of Notre Dame watch from above as a historical witness and protector. This is the work of Karl Umlauf.

Umlauf's exhibition of drawings and sculptures are displayed in the Martin Museum of Art in the Hooper-Schaefer Fine Arts Center.

''The Midnight Vigil' series of drawings and studies of gargoyles act as a distraction away from the industrial style of the sculptures,' Umlauf said. 'The architecture of cathedrals and factories share the same sanctity of place.'

Umlauf, a teacher of painting and drawing at Baylor, was granted a year-long sabbatical to travel and create. The sabbatical exhibition in the Martin Museum of Art is the product of his travels through Europe and the salvage yards of Waco.

'The exhibition is outside the expected or the ordinary, contemporary format of a show,' said Dr. Heidi Hornik, director of the Martin Museum.

Umlauf visited Birmingham, England and the industrial cities of Germany in search of inspiration. On returning to Waco, Umlauf searched salvage yards for materials to create his art.

The sculptures are a sort of puzzle containing the refuse of industry and the modern age. Umlauf used pipes, bits of metal and wire to create the sculptures which hang on the walls of the gallery.

'The Urban Retrieval series utilizes the waste products of city streets and incorporates the objects into part of a work of art,' said Hornik. 'The objects are outside their tradition world and have, to an extent, entered another realm.'

The 'Karl Umlauf: Baylor Sabbatical Exhibition' runs through March 7. The Martin Museum is open Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday noon to 5 p.m. and during theater performances.

Umlauf will speak today at 7 p.m. in 149 Hooper-Schaefer, with a reception in the museum following the lecture.

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