Baylor > Lariat Archives > News


Congress passes 4 pieces of legislation

Nov. 11, 1997

By Emily Wininger

Reporter for The Baylor Lariat

Student Congress unanimously passed legislation concerning meal plan reform, the possiblity of an outdoor classroom, changes in the licensing fee for student organizations and support for the possiblity of a new parking garage Thursday evening at its regular meeting. Congress President Mark Freeman dubbed the meeting 'an impressive effort to serve the student body.'

The first bill, titled Meal Plan Reform, requires all freshman living in university-sponsored housing to have a 13- or 20- meal plan, while sophomores, juniors and seniors living in university housing can choose a meal plan of as few as, but at least six meals per week.

At-large representative Charlene Scott, a Corpus Christi sophomore and bill co-author, said, 'We put together the Meal Plan Reform bill to equalize the required meal plans specified for students living in the dorms.'

According to Scott, the current meal plan requirements listed in the Guide to Residence Hall Living vary for each of the dorms. The guide states, 'Residents of Collins, Dawson, North Russell and Penland Halls are required to have either a 13- or 20- meal plan. Board is optional for residents of all other halls.'

'We wanted to change the current requirements so that the meal plans could be based on classification rather than where you live,' Scott said. At-large representative Dax Schymick, a Longview junior, is also an author of the bill.

Bill CR 45-5, the Outdoor Classroom Act, is an effort to urge the administration to convert the muddy ground area between the Carroll Science Building and Old Main into an outdoor learning center.

Freeman said the university has been working on plans for the area for some time, but Congress decided to propose a bill when the idea of an outdoor classroom was brought to Congress by Jeff Johnson, a Lubbock senior.

'There is no debate on whether or not something should be done to the area. We were very excited when Jeff approached us about this idea,' Freeman said. 'The outdoor classroom act is an opportunity for students to voice their opinion on how to resurface that area of campus. However, Congress welcomes other suggestions from students.'

Freshman class representative Joshua Flynt of Garland, the bill's author, said the outdoor space will be multi-functional as a place for class meetings, musical concerts or just for sitting outside.

'Everybody I've talked to as far as students and faculty has been excited about this,' he said. 'An outdoor classroom is a great way to foster discussion.'

Flynt said a copy of the bill will be sent to the appropriate administration, including Ken Simons, assistant vice president and business manager, who has been working on a plan for the specified area, as well as ASLA landscape architect J. Robert Anderson.

A third bill requests that the current 3.75 percent licensing fee be waived for student organizations who are officially recognized by the university and who follow the proper steps to gain approval for the designs they wish to print if the items are not printed for profit. The bill was written by sophomore class representative Grant Walsh of Dallas and education representative Christy Rome of Stafford.

'The university should not use organizations who provide service to Baylor and the Waco community as a means of profit. Removing this policy would encourage organizations to place Baylor's name and logo on shirts, thus providing advertisement for the university,' Freeman said.

In further business, Congress passed a support resolution for the administration's consideration of the addition of a new parking garage near Hankamer School of Business.

According to the bill's authors, Melanie Ells, an off-campus representative from Canyon, Calif., and Jenny Castagna, a business representative from Kingwood, the resolution was written because parking is a perpetual problem on campus and students have voiced a number of concerns on this issue in The Baylor Lariat as well as The Waco Tribune-Herald.

After a student body officer report from Freeman on the 'Statement on Scholar-ly Expectations' and the 'Faculty Workload Policy,' Congress also passed a reaction to the statements asking for university officials to change the 'Statement of Scholarly Expectations' to express the importance to service to students in tenured and tenure-track appointments and to ensure that service will be rewarded. The reaction also called for a change in the 'Faculty Workload Policy' to give appropriate credit to those courses traditionally given credit.

Freeman said the reaction was passed because students did not feel that they were allowed to voice concerns before the creation of these policies, which many students feel directly affect them. Emily Wininger

Reporter for The Baylor Lariat

Student Congress unanimously passed legislation concerning meal plan reform, the possiblity of an outdoor classroom, changes in the licensing fee for student organizations, a support for the possiblity of a new parking garage and a student reaction to recent universtiy policy changes Thursday evening in its regular meeting which Congress President Mark Freeman dubbed 'an impressive effort to serve the student body.'

The first bill, titled Meal Plan Reform, requires all freshman living in university-sponsored housing to have a 13 or 20 meal plan, while sophomores, juniors and seniors living in university housing can choose a meal plan of as few as, but at least six meals per week.

At-Large representative Charlene Scott, a Corpus Christi sophomore and bill co-author, said, 'We put together the meal plan reform bill to equalize the required meal plans specified for students living in the dorms.'

According to Scott, the current meal plan requirements listed in the Guide to Residence Hall Living, vary for each of the dorms. The guide states, 'Residents of Collins, Dawson, North Russell and Penland Halls are required to have either a 13 or 20 meal plan. Board is optional for residents of all other halls.'

'We wanted to change the current requirements so that the meal plans could be based on classification rather than where you live,' Scott said. At-Large representative, Dax Schymick, a Longview junior, is also an author of the bill.

Bill CR 45-5, the Outdoor Classroom Act, is an effort to urge the administration to convert the muddy ground area between the Carroll Science Building and Old Main into an outdoor learning center.

Freeman said the university has been working on plans for the area for some time, but Congress decided to propose a bill when the idea of an outdoor classroom was brought to Congress by Jeff Johnson, a Lubbock senior.

'There is no debate on whether or not something should be done to the area. We were very excited when Jeff approached us about this idea. The outdoor classroom act is an opportunity for students to voice their opinion on how to resurface that area of campus. However, Congress welcomes other suggestions from students,' Freeman said.

Freshman class representative Joshua Flynt of Garland, bill author, said the outdoor space will be multi-functional as a place for class meetings, musical concerts, or just for sitting outside. 'Everybody I've talked to as far as students and faculty has been excited about this. An outdoor classroom is a great way to foster discussion,' he said.

Flynt said that a copy of the bill will be sent to the appropriate administration including Ken Simons, assistant vice president and business manager, who has been working on a plan for the specified area as well as ASLA Landscape Architect, J. Robert Anderson.

A third bill, requests that the current 3.75 percent licensing fee by waived for student organizations who are officially recognized by the university and who follow the proper steps to gain approval for the designs they wish to print if the items are not printed for profit. The bill was written by sophomore class representative, Grant Walsh of Dallas, and education representative, Christy Rome of Stafford.

'The university should not use organizations who provide service to Baylor and the Waco community as a means of profit. Removing this policy would encourage organizations to place Baylor's name and logo on shirts, thus providing advertisement for the university,' Freeman said.

In further business, Congress passed a support resolution for the administration's consideration of the addition of a new parking garage near Hankamer School of Business.

According to the bill authors Melanie Ells, an off-campus representative from Canyon, Calif., and Jenny Castagna, business representative from Kingwood, the resolution was written because parking is a perpetual problem on the campus and students have voiced a number of concerns on this issue in The Baylor Lariat as well as The Waco Tribune-Herald.

After a student body officer report from Freeman on the 'Statement on Scholarly Expectations' and the 'Faculty Workload Policy' congress also passed a reaction to the statements asking for university officials to change the 'Statement of Scholarly Expectations' to express the importance to service to students in tenured and tenured-track appointments and to ensure that service will be rewarded. The reaction also called for a change in the 'Faculty Workload Policy' to give appropriate credit to those courses traditionally given credit.

Freeman said the reaction was passed because students did not feel that they were allowed to voice concerns before the creation of this policy which many students feel directly effect them.

Emily Wininger

Reporter for The Baylor Lariat

Student Congress unanimously passed legislation concerning meal plan reform, the possiblity of an outdoor classroom, changes in the licensing fee for student organizations, a support for the possiblity of a new parking garage and a student reaction to recent universtiy policy changes Thursday evening in its regular meeting which Congress President Mark Freeman dubbed 'an impressive effort to serve the student body.'

The first bill, titled Meal Plan Reform, requires all freshman living in university-sponsored housing to have a 13 or 20 meal plan, while sophomores, juniors and seniors living in university housing can choose a meal plan of as few as, but at least six meals per week.

At-Large representative Charlene Scott, a Corpus Christi sophomore and bill co-author, said, 'We put together the meal plan reform bill to equalize the required meal plans specified for students living in the dorms.'

According to Scott, the current meal plan requirements listed in the Guide to Residence Hall Living, vary for each of the dorms. The guide states, 'Residents of Collins, Dawson, North Russell and Penland Halls are required to have either a 13 or 20 meal plan. Board is optional for residents of all other halls.'

'We wanted to change the current requirements so that the meal plans could be based on classification rather than where you live,' Scott said. At-Large representative, Dax Schymick, a Longview junior, is also an author of the bill.

Bill CR 45-5, the Outdoor Classroom Act, is an effort to urge the administration to convert the muddy ground area between the Carroll Science Building and Old Main into an outdoor learning center.

Freeman said the university has been working on plans for the area for some time, but Congress decided to propose a bill when the idea of an outdoor classroom was brought to Congress by Jeff Johnson, a Lubbock senior.

'There is no debate on whether or not something should be done to the area. We were very excited when Jeff approached us about this idea. The outdoor classroom act is an opportunity for students to voice their opinion on how to resurface that area of campus. However, Congress welcomes other suggestions from students,' Freeman said.

Freshman class representative Joshua Flynt of Garland, bill author, said the outdoor space will be multi-functional as a place for class meetings, musical concerts, or just for sitting outside. 'Everybody I've talked to as far as students and faculty has been excited about this. An outdoor classroom is a great way to foster discussion,' he said.

Flynt said that a copy of the bill will be sent to the appropriate administration including Ken Simons, assistant vice president and business manager, who has been working on a plan for the specified area as well as ASLA Landscape Architect, J. Robert Anderson.

A third bill, requests that the current 3.75 percent licensing fee by waived for student organizations who are officially recognized by the university and who follow the proper steps to gain approval for the designs they wish to print if the items are not printed for profit. The bill was written by sophomore class representative, Grant Walsh of Dallas, and education representative, Christy Rome of Stafford.

'The university should not use organizations who provide service to Baylor and the Waco community as a means of profit. Removing this policy would encourage organizations to place Baylor's name and logo on shirts, thus providing advertisement for the university,' Freeman said.

In further business, Congress passed a support resolution for the administration's consideration of the addition of a new parking garage near Hankamer School of Business.

According to the bill authors Melanie Ells, an off-campus representative from Canyon, Calif., and Jenny Castagna, business representative from Kingwood, the resolution was written because parking is a perpetual problem on the campus and students have voiced a number of concerns on this issue in The Baylor Lariat as well as The Waco Tribune-Herald.

After a student body officer report from Freeman on the 'Statement on Scholarly Expectations' and the 'Faculty Workload Policy' congress also passed a reaction to the statements asking for university officials to change the 'Statement of Scholarly Expectations' to express the importance to service to students in tenured and tenured-track appointments and to ensure that service will be rewarded. The reaction also called for a change in the 'Faculty Workload Policy' to give appropriate credit to those courses traditionally given credit.

Freeman said the reaction was passed because students did not feel that they were allowed to voice concerns before the creation of this policy which many students feel directly effect them.

Copyright © 1997 The Lariat

Comments or Questions can be sent to The Lariat