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Jul
6
2015
Deadly Divide: HRC Faculty Fellow Addresses Migrant Death on the Border
Deadly Divide: HRC Faculty Fellow Addresses Migrant Death on the Border
Lori Baker, Ph.D., associate professor of anthropology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences and faculty fellow of the Honors Residential College, is interviewed for this radio documentary that takes listeners to the desert ranch lands of Brooks County and the border town of Reynosa, Tamaulipas. Baker’s part of the documentary runs from 12:14-16:53. Baker is the founder of the “Reuniting Families Project,” which helps recover and identify the remains of unnamed individuals who died while attempting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border.

Jul
6
2015
Was he free? Was he happy? The question is absurd. Honors Program Professor Responds
Alan Jacobs, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Humanities in the Honors Program in Baylor’s Honors College, reacts to a story in The New York Times about a report indicating that people with more money are generally happy but that happiness should not be confused with contentment, satisfaction or achievement. The report also found that satisfaction rose with wealth, and 85 percent of those with over $5 million reported that they were “highly satisfied” — despite jobs that often entail long hours and high pressure. Asks Jacobs: “What good is that happiness if the millionaires who have it cannot enjoy the freedom the money gives them, the freedom that most people would love to have? . . .My takeaway from reading this article: no one involved, from the investigators to the respondents to the reporter, has any idea what they mean by ‘happy’ or ‘satisfied’ or ‘content’ or ‘free.’”
Jun
22
2015
Cell Phone Addiction Hurting Academics
A study by James Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing in Hankamer School of Business, found that as cellphone capabilities have advanced, so has the possibility of addiction to them. In his most recent study, published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, he found that excessive cellphone use “absolutely poses a potential risk for impairing academic performance . . . We need to identify the activities that push cellphone use from being a helpful tool to one that undermines our well-being and that of others.”