News

Oct
24
2016
Dr. Jacalyn Duffin will be talking about the History of Medicine.

October 24th 3:30-5:00 "Medical Miracles: Doctors, Saints and Healing in the Modern World"

October 25th 3:30-5:00 "Lovers and Livers: Disease Concepts in History"

Each Lecture will be held in Foster 240
Apr
29
2016
Apr
14
2016
The Keston Center for Religion, Politics, and Society proudly presents “Combating God and Grandma: Soviet Anti-Religious Policies and the Battle for Childhood,” featuring Baylor’s own Dr. Julie deGraffenried, Associate Professor of History. The lecture will be held Thursday, April 14, 2016, at 3:30 p.m. in the Michael Bourdeaux Research Center located on the third floor of Carroll Library. This event is free and open to the public.

Dr. deGraffenried’s presentation will examine the anti-religious campaigns of Soviet authorities through the eyes of a child and consider the conflicts between state and family and between tradition and modernity, focusing on the children affected by these policies. “The Soviet Union gives us a case study to explore and think about state efforts to regulate and/or eradicate religion,” said deGraffenried. “In this day and age, when religious freedom (or the lack of it) has become front-page news, historical examples can provide insight into current issues.”

This event is co-sponsored by the Baylor Department of History and the McBride Center for International Business. For more information, please visit baylor.edu/library/godandgrandma or call (254) 710-1571.

The Keston Center for Religion, Politics, and Society promotes the research, teaching, and understanding of religion and politics in communist, post-communist, and other totalitarian societies. Mark your calendar and welcome your colleagues to join you for this timely and engaging presentation.
Apr
5
2016
"The History of Human Dignity", by Dr. Lynn Hunt, Distinguished Professor and Eugen Weber Endowed Chair in Modern European History, UCLA
Apr
4
2016
"Novels, Empathy, and the Origins of Human Rights", by Dr. Lynn Hunt, Distinguished Research Professor and Eugen Weber Endowed Chair in Modern European History, UCLA
Mar
15
2016
One of the civil rights movement’s most respected figures, Dr. Vivian believes there is no separation between civil rights, faith and ministry, because “racism is a moral issue.” He and other ministers founded Nashville Christian Leadership Conference which organized the city’s first sit-ins in 1960 and led the first march of the Civil Rights Movement. A movie screening of Selma will be shown at 3:00 pm in Waco Hall.
Free tickets are available at S.U.B. & Waco Hall before the event.
Tuesday, March 15, 2016
6:00 p.m.
Waco Hall
Mar
4
2016
“Books smell like old people.” Maybe that explains why most teenagers these days are avoiding them so ardently. I came across that eye-opening rationale last week in an arresting article by journalist David Denby, who wondered if teenagers ever read seriously any more. He discovered the answer was no, and it was a teenager in New Haven who delivered that reaction typical of many in today’s generation.

“Reading has lost its privileged status,” Denby writes, so much so that “few kids are ashamed that they’re not doing it much. The notion that you should always have a book going — that notion, which all real readers share, doesn’t flourish in many kids.” Reading literature for pleasure is a declining pastime among younger people, and that has much in common with the plight of the arts in our current culture. Many people simply act as though neither activity is worth the effort. What’s most to blame is the materialism that is so characteristic of our culture.




Measurable results

While a few people clearly understand that reading literature can be a transformative experience, the problem is proving that to a society that demands measurable results. Standing in the way is “the American notion that assertions unsupported with statistics are virtually meaningless.”

How do you accumulate statistics when what literature, and the arts more broadly, give is immeasurable? How do you make a case for something profoundly spiritual in a culture that is increasingly materialistic? That’s the $64,000 question these days. (It’s OK if you have to look up that reference.)

That’s why interacting with art and literature is not within today’s idea of education, which for most people means science, technology, engineering and mathematics. No less prominent a person than the current president angered some people two years ago by remarking that the country doesn’t need a lot of people going to college and getting degrees in art history when they could be doing something practical like working in manufacturing. And then when he backtracked and apologized, one of the people currently campaigning to get his job immediately criticized him for apologizing.

“We need more degrees that lead to jobs,” Marco Rubio tweeted.

Pragmatism

So in a materialistic, practical society, why go see a play when the television is right there? Why go listen to an orchestra when you’ve got the mp3, or you can YouTube the New York Philharmonic from the couch? And who has time for a 20-minute symphony anyway? Why ought we to care about George S. Kaufman or Jackson Pollock? Why read “Moby Dick” or “Ulysses” or “Ode on a Grecian Urn”? None of that will help you get a job.

Last Sunday morning, already worried by this matter of vanishing readers, as I listened to a fine orchestra play a hymn I started wondering where tomorrow’s oboe players are going to come from.

Why on earth would a young person in so materialistic a culture as ours devote the time and effort required to master an instrument? From where will come the encouragement to press through the difficulty of mastering the oboe? (By the way, I have students whose parents instruct them not to major in history even if they love it — I can’t imagine what they’d say to the kid who wanted to be an oboe player.)

Thankfully, the wisdom of youth is not completely squelched by the shortsightedness of materialism. So we still manage to have oboe players, history majors and all those other inquisitive, gold souls who somehow manage to do something as countercultural as pick up a paintbrush, a musical instrument or, one can hope, a book.
Feb
29
2016
"Gender and the Politics of Invisibility: Making Historical Sense of Enforced Disappearance in Post-Colonial Uganda", by Dr. Alicia Decker, Pennsylvania State University
Feb
4
2016
Baylor University’s Mayborn Museum Complex continues their Director’s Forum again on February 4th and 5th, 2016. Each year we highlight one of our museum’s permanent exhibits to provide more in-depth educational enrichment for our museum members, Baylor faculty, students, the community, and our staff. Reservations are strongly suggested because of limited seating.

This year our lecture series will highlight our Historic Village, specifically our Planter’s House, Tenant House and the Cotton Plantation culture in Waco at the turn of the twentieth century. We are hosting Dr. Watson Arnold with a series titled “The Rise and Fall of the Cotton Culture.” Dr. Arnold has custom fit a presentation for our 2016 Director’s Forum. Our goal is for these lectures to be educational: however, the entertainment factor is important as well and Dr. Arnold certainly fits that bill!
Jan
22
2016
Today, we remember the ten students of the 1927 Men’s Basketball team who lost their lives’ in a train-bus crash on January 22, 1927. Of the Immortal Ten is Mr. William Penn Winchester, a senior originally from Waco, whom majored in both History and French.
Sep
21
2015
On the heels of a new injection of public interest from last week's Republican presidential debate, 10 Baylor University faculty members will present their choices Tuesday afternoon for the new face on the $10 bill.
Sep
18
2015
Associate Professor Dr. Julie deGraffenried wins the second annual Guittard Book Award.
Sep
14
2015
The Thirty-Eighth Charles Edmondson Historical Lectures will be postponed to April 4-5, 2016. Dr. Lynn Hunt, Distinguished Research Professor & Eugen Weber Endowed Chair in Modern European History, UCLA, will lecture on "The History of Human Rights."
Aug
7
2015
For its strong analysis and examination of international and interdisciplinary oral history work in post-disaster settings, Listening on the Edge: Oral History in the Aftermath of Catastrophe co-edited by Associate Professor Stephen Sloan has been awarded the 2015 Book Award from the Oral History Association.
Jul
7
2015
WACO, Texas (June 24, 2015)- Some notable but lesser-known women in American history might be overlooked as possibilities for the soon-to-be redesigned $10 bill-the first paper currency in more than a century to feature a portrait of a woman.

An online poll earlier this year advocating for women on the $20 brought forth 20 nominees, including such well-known names as Harriet Tubman, Eleanor Roosevelt, Rosa Parks and Wilma Mankiller.

But are there other women in U.S. history who merit consideration on the $10?

Kimberly R. Kellison, Ph.D., associate professor and chair of the history department in Baylor’s College of Arts and Sciences, compiled a list of remarkable but maybe less known women who meet the Treasury’s criteria as champions of democracy or who helped break boundaries in a democratic society.

“I chose eight women who were not a part of the original short list for the WomenOn20s campaign,” Kellison said. “What unites the women, even though they lived in different times and addressed various causes, is their passion for improving the conditions of those who faced oppression or inequality.”
Jun
25
2015
The resident Director of the program at Baylor University, Dr. Joan Supplee, will be responsible for providing relevant information on the possibility of exchange students of the faculty. You will accompany you in the presentation of the Board of Directors of the CELE (Centre of Spanish as a foreign language, the Undersecretary for policy language-dependent), organizer of the meeting.
Jun
15
2015
Baptists started as outsiders in Colonial America, played a crucial role in the shaping of this country's religious freedom and grew to become the largest Protestant denomination in America by the 20th century.

In the shift from outsiders to insiders with considerable political power, however, Baptists have considered themselves outsiders to the larger culture — even as members of the historically fractious Christian denomination show up on both sides of many important national questions.

That’s one of the observations of “Baptists In America,” a new history of the demonination written by Baylor University history professors Thomas Kidd and Barry Hankins and published by Oxford University Press.

The two focus on religious history in their research and writing — Kidd in early America, Hankins in the 20th century.

Combining their specializations to create a history examining the role of Baptists was an idea that happened shortly after Kidd’s arrival at Baylor in 2002.

Both historians have authored several books in their fields. Kidd has written biographies of American Patrick Henry (“Patrick Henry: First Among Patriots”) and influential English evangelist George Whitefield (“George Whitefield: America’s Spiritual Founding Father”), as well as a look at religion in America’s formation (“God of Liberty: A Religious History of the American Revolution”).

Hankins’ book subjects include flamboyant and controversial Texas Baptist preacher J. Frank Norris (“God’s Rascal”); the interaction of evangelicals and America’s Jazz Age (“Jesus and Gin”); and the history “American Evangelicals.”

Both are also Baptists and found in their studies that Baptist history offered a way of looking at the larger story of religion in America.

“When you’re looking at religious trends in America, there’s no better way than to tell them than through the lens of Baptists,” Kidd said.

What the Baylor professors wanted in their book was something readable that non-Baptists and Baptists alike would find interesting.
Apr
29
2015
Norman W. Cox Award, The Baptist History and Heritage Society, 2014. "Suffering for Their Consciences: The Depiction of Anabaptists and Baptists in the Eighteenth-Century Histories of Daniel Neal," Baptist History & Heritage 49, no. 3, "Baptists on the Margins: Minorities, Borders, and Controversies" (Fall 2014): 39-67. Awarded to "the person judged to have written the best article published in Baptist History and Heritage in the preceding calendar year."
Apr
29
2015
Dr. David A. Smith senior lecturer in American history at Baylor University publishes, "Price of Valor: The Life of Audie Murphy". More information is available on:
http://davidasmith.net/the-price-of-valor.html & http://www.realclearhistory.com/articles/2015/04/24/price_of_valor_the_life_of_audie_murphy_210.html
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