Germane


Overview

Germane can spontaneously combust in air. Inhalation may cause headache, nausea and vomiting. Germane may also damage red blood cells and the kidneys.

Emergency Procedures

Since there are no known effects from skin or eye contact or ingestion, treatment is unknown. Guidelines can be established based on its similarity to arsine.

Inhalation: Inhalation symptoms include headache, nausea, vomiting, tightness in the chest and pain in the abdomen and loins. Since it has been known to be a hemolytic agent, there could also be damage to red blood cells and kidney damage. However, since there are no known instances of germane poisoning, treatment is unknown. Guidelines can be established based on its similarity to arsine. Seek immediate medical attention.

Handling

Germane is considered a pyrophoric or spontaneously combustible gas; however, its ignition is not frequently encountered. Earth-ground and bond all lines and equipment associated with the germane system. Electrical equipment should be non-sparking or explosion-proof. Avoid incompatibles such as oxidizers and bromine.

Storage

Because germane may be pyrophoric, do not store with other flammable products. Consider using leak detection and alarm systems. Keep storage area separate from work areas. Comply with all applicable recommendations for storage and handling of compressed gases.

Disposal

Germane cylinders should be returned to the compressed gas distributor when emptied or no longer used.


Section 10 Chemical List