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Social Security Needs Dependability, Even If Benefits Decrease: Retirement Scan
[1/23/2015]
Financial Planning: Compilation of advice from articles in major news outlets on social security and financial planning. From the Wall Street Journal, William Reichenstein, Ph.D., professor of finance and The Pat and Thomas R. Powers Chair of Investment Management at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, says Congress needs to revamp Social Security to ensure that retirees will receive about 75% of their benefits in case the trust fund is depleted. He suggests using a new measure that yields a lower inflation than what the current formula provides. "I believe most of us would rather have a slightly lower level of promised benefits that we can depend on than to have a potentially dramatic reduction in benefits about 2033,” Reichenstein said.
(FULL STORY)

A Crucial Resume Tip for Seniors Looking for Work
[1/21/2015]
The Wall Street Journal: William Reichenstein, Ph.D., professor and The Pat and Thomas R. Powers Chair of Investment in Management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, writes that senior citizens searching for jobs should tailor their resumes for “the job opening in question.” While it is important to seem qualified for a position, a resume should not be bogged down with previous accomplishments. Instead, applicants “can remove some items and better highlight” other achievements, Reichenstein says. Dr. Reichenstein is part of “The Experts,” a group of industry, academic and cultural thinkers who weigh in on the latest debates in The Journal Report.
(FULL STORY)

Emily Hunter Interview on “Is the Customer Always Right?”
[1/17/2015]
KGO-AM “Consumer Talk”: AUDIO: Emily Hunter, Ph.D., assistant professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, is interviewed by San Francisco radio talk show host Michael Finney regarding her research of food service workers who retaliate after encountering disagreeable customers. Hunter describes a number of the behaviors and, knowing that there will always be such customers, she suggests employers and managers take steps – including specialized training and instituting an open-door policy – to help servers reconsider acting out.
(FULL STORY)

Service employees need to focus on customer experience
[1/15/2015]
Suncoast News: Emily Hunter, Ph.D., assistant professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, is featured in this story regarding her research of food service workers who retaliate after encountering disagreeable customers. Hunter provides a list of tips to help managers create a work atmosphere in which servers are less inclined to engage in counterproductive work behavior. “Providing servers with more control, flexibility and empowerment to handle customer issues can buffer buildup of stress and prevent employees from retaliating at their customers,” Hunter said.
(FULL STORY)

The Best Online Tools for Retirement Planning and Living
[1/15/2015]
The Wall Street Journal: A growing array of apps and websites makes it easier to complete many of the most basic — and most important — tasks, from saving money and creating legal documents to figuring out a second career and where to live. Quoted is William Reichenstein, Ph.D., professor and holder of The Pat and Thomas R. Powers Chair of Investment in Management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. “Our research has shown that an optimal Social Security strategy, combined with tax-efficient withdrawals, can extend the life of a portfolio by as much as 10 years or longer,” he said.
(FULL STORY)

Women in IT
[1/15/2015]
According to Cindy Riemenschneider, professor of information systems, there are a number of challenges for women in IT today. Barriers stem from the fact that so few women are in the higher levels of organizations to begin with. In addition, the way work-family balance is viewed is still gender biased.
(FULL STORY)

Yes, Nasty Restaurant Customers, Servers Will Indeed Sabotage Your Food
[1/13/2015]
AdWeek: This article focuses on a study of customer-directed counterproductive work behavior co-authored by Emily Hunter, Ph.D., assistant professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. The study of more than 400 frontline food service workers showed that the majority had participated in adverse behavior following an interaction with a disagreeable customer. Hunter, an expert on workplace deviance, is quoted in the story. "Behavior of frontline employees has a real impact on the company's bottom line," Hunter said. "Therefore, preventing counterproductive behaviors where employees yell at, ignore or degrade customers is critical."
(FULL STORY)

iPhone Separation Anxiety is Really a Thing, Researchers Say
[1/12/2015]
Network World: Article on research that shows that cellphone separation can have negative physical and mental effects on iPhone users references a 2014 Baylor study that found that women college students spend an average of 10 hours a day on their cellphones, and men almost eight hours. “That’s astounding,” said James Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. “As cellphone functions increase, addictions to this seemingly indispensable piece of technology become an increasingly realistic possibility.”
(FULL STORY)

Travel has its Advantages
[1/8/2015]
Professor of information systems, Cindy Riemenschneider, says studying overseas gives students a leg up on their resume and opens the door for internships abroad. “It offers opportunities for students that there is no way to replicate that in a classroom. It opens their eyes to see that there are many different ways that people do things that are not like the United States. Their philosophy with regard to work is very different.”
(FULL STORY)

Where Does CRM Go from Here?
[1/1/2015]
CRM Magazine: Article about customer relationship management quotes Jeff Tanner, Ph.D., professor of marketing and executive director of Baylor Business Collaborative in the Hankamer School of Business, about predictions for shifts in 2015 in sales, marketing and customer service. Tanner says that “businesses have been emphasizing the wrong technology and incentivizing the wrong behaviors. We've been promising that technology would empower salespeople, but that hasn't happened. CRM is still mostly used as a management tool.”
(FULL STORY)


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