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Creating the Right Setting for Success
[8/27/2015]
Leadership expert Dan Rockwell says culture building helps to attract and retain the kind of people who will fulfill a company’s mission. He says some industries, such as banking, government and education, can be slower to change culture. He advises to start small, with a division, a team, or an office. And remember, a “great place to work” is often determined by what is tolerated on the job. For example, management allowing rudeness in a meeting, or allowing a great performer to break the rules.
(FULL STORY)

How to Stop Comparing Yourself To Others
[8/19/2015]
Rewire Me: This blog on the “key to happiness” explores research by James Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. He posits that the pursuit of material possessions may not equate to happiness but rather dissatisfaction. “People who pursue happiness through material gain tend to feel worse, and this is related to negative appraisals of their satisfaction with life,” wrote Roberts in his study, published in The Journal of Positive Psychology.
(FULL STORY)

Is the Customer Always Right?
[8/6/2015]
Research indicates that an employee’s repeated exposure to violations of moral principle can have a large impact on their personal life. Witnessing customers returning clothing they’ve worn, or abusing assistance programs, for example, leave employees depleted of energy to perform well at work, as well as causing friction with co-workers and their family at home.
(FULL STORY)

The Astoundingly Simple Secret That Makes Argentines the Best Texters in the World
[7/31/2015]
Mic: This article focuses on the growing trend of voice and audio messages – in lieu of traditional texting – that people are adopting around the world. The story cites research by James Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, which revealed that college students spend an average of eight to 10 hours per day on their cellphones.
(FULL STORY)

Cell Phone Snubbing
[7/23/2015]
From sending pictures of food on Snapchat, to “checking in” on Facebook, phone snubbing – or “phubbing” – can weaken a relationship, according to one professor’s research. Her advice? Establish mobile phone boundaries with your partner.
(FULL STORY)

3 Ways To Ditch Hierarchy And Improve Company Performance
[7/17/2015]
YFS Magazine: Per Bylund, Ph.D., research professor of entrepreneurship in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, wrote this column addressing the pros and cons of ditching hierarchy and adopting a “horizontal” business structure. He offers three keys to making such a structure as productive as possible.
(FULL STORY)

Successful New Ventures
[7/16/2015]
Ted Waldron offers a three-part formula for a successful start-up: Don’t try to go head-to-head with the major player in a market segment, provide a complimentary offering that extends or supplements a major competitor’s position, and wait for fragmentation in the supply chain.
(FULL STORY)

3 Unexpected Ways to Help Your Kids Be Mindful About Screen Time
[7/14/2015]
The Huffington Post: Article includes three experts' viewpoints on family technology use. Quoted is Jim Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. Roberts, author of “Too Much of a Good Thing: Are You Addicted to Your Smart Phone?”, suggests tech-free zones of the house and times of the day – for everyone – so that cellphone use does not interfere with family relationships.
(FULL STORY)

Corporate Philanthropy
[7/9/2015]
There are some potential dangers to corporate social responsibility. Blaine McCormick provides perspectives from the consumer, the target of the philanthropy, and the shareholders.
(FULL STORY)

Know When It's Time to Get a New Job
[6/30/2015]
John Tesh’s Intelligence for Your Life: Article about unhappiness at work cites a 2011 study by Baylor researchers, who found that workers with a hostile supervisor were much more likely to have problems with their partners than those with supportive bosses. The workers also are were more likely to take out their frustrations on their family because they felt powerless at work. The study, published in Personnel Psychology, was conducted by Dawn Carlson, Ph.D., professor of management and The H.R. Gibson Chair of Organizational Development at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, and former management professor Merideth Ferguson.
(FULL STORY)


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