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iPhone Separation Anxiety is Really a Thing, Researchers Say
[1/12/2015]
Network World: Article on research that shows that cellphone separation can have negative physical and mental effects on iPhone users references a 2014 Baylor study that found that women college students spend an average of 10 hours a day on their cellphones, and men almost eight hours. “That’s astounding,” said James Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. “As cellphone functions increase, addictions to this seemingly indispensable piece of technology become an increasingly realistic possibility.”
(FULL STORY)

Where Does CRM Go from Here?
[1/1/2015]
CRM Magazine: Article about customer relationship management quotes Jeff Tanner, Ph.D., professor of marketing and executive director of Baylor Business Collaborative in the Hankamer School of Business, about predictions for shifts in 2015 in sales, marketing and customer service. Tanner says that “businesses have been emphasizing the wrong technology and incentivizing the wrong behaviors. We've been promising that technology would empower salespeople, but that hasn't happened. CRM is still mostly used as a management tool.”
(FULL STORY)

Pair that tweets together, stays together?
[12/18/2014]
The Houston Chronicle: Article originally published Dec. 3 in the New York Times about the negative effects that technology can have on interpersonal relationships references a study by James Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professorship in Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, which found that paying too much attention to a cellphone could ruin relationships with loved ones and friends. “Phubbing your significant other by giving precedence to your phone activities over paying attention to your significant other is a path to strained relationships,” Roberts said.
(FULL STORY)

Rising cellphone use hurts young people, experts say
[12/15/2014]
Times Colonist: Column about the dangers of being a cellphone junkie mentions a recent study on cellphone addiction by James Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. Roberts found that women spent an average of 10 hours per day and men nearly eight on their electronic devices.
(FULL STORY)

When Discounting Is Bad for Business, and How Marketing Can Help
[12/9/2014]
The Huffington Post: Column by Vala Afshar, chief marketing officer with Extreme Networks, and Jeff Tanner, Ph.D., professor of marketing at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business and author of “Analytics & Dynamic Customer Strategy: Big Profits from Big Data,” about data-driven scientific marketing that can help businesses readily see results. However, not all companies are yet taking advantage of the data. Tanner provides a real example of a business that posed a marketing hypothesis – in this case one that went against conventional discounting wisdom – set up an experiment and received great data to validate the hypothesis and improve the business.
(FULL STORY)

Put down that phone! ‘Technoference’ may be hurting your relationship
[12/5/2014]
NBC’s Today Show: This article incorporates findings from a study by James Roberts, Ph.D., holder of The Ben H. Williams Professorship in Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, revealing that paying too much attention to a cellphone could ruin relationships with loved ones and friends. “Cell phone attachment is positively related to an increase in stress and anxiety and even depression,” Roberts said.
(FULL STORY)

Are Gadget-Free Bedrooms the Secret to a Happy Relationship?
[12/3/2014]
New York Times: Article about the negative effects that technology can have on interpersonal relationships references a study by James Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professorship in Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, which found that paying too much attention to a cellphone could ruin relationships with loved ones and friends. “Phubbing your significant other by giving precedence to your phone activities over paying attention to your significant other is a path to strained relationships,” Roberts said.
(FULL STORY)

Thanksgiving and Gratitude: The Science of Happier Holidays
[11/28/2014]
The Wall Street Journal: During the holidays, it’s easy to get caught up in spending and materialism. But a Baylor University finds that materialistic people are less satisfied with life and suffer higher levels of anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Jo-Ann Tsang, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology and neuroscience in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, surveyed 246 undergraduate students to measure their levels of materialism, life satisfaction and gratitude. Study co-author was James Roberts, Ph.D., holder of The Ben H. Williams Professorship in Marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. The study was published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.
(FULL STORY)

The New Era of Marketing: Adaptive Customer Engagement
[11/23/2014]
The Customer Edge: Jeff Tanner, Ph.D., professor of marketing in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, is quoted in this article addressing the “new era” in marketing, specifically, the move away from marketing campaigns and the focus on adaptive customer engagement. “If we’re going to listen, we want to do that so we know what the next thing is to say,” Tanner said. “And it’s not always, ‘Buy this!’ … It’s got to be that longer-term conversation that extends well beyond the transaction.”
(FULL STORY)

The Formal Side of Sales Training
[11/19/2014]
Business Talk 1110 KTEK-AM: Kevin Price, host of The Price of Business on KTEK 1110 in Houston, interviews Andrea Dixon, Ph.D., holder of The Frank M. And Floy Smith Holloway Professorship in Marketing and executive director of Baylor University’s Center for Professional Selling and the Keller Center for Research in the Hankamer School of Business. Dixon gives a thorough overview of Baylor’s award-winning professional selling program. She highlights alumni success, internships and the unique features of the program.
(FULL STORY)


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