Baylor University
Department of Biology
College of Arts and Sciences

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Undergraduate Courses

BIO 1305, 1105, 1306, 1106 are prerequisite to all 2000 and above level courses in biology (except BIO 2401 and 2402). Non-biology majors may be admitted to upper-level courses without these prerequisites with consent of instructor and department chair.

(Figures in parentheses following course descriptions represent hours per week in lecture and laboratory, respectively. A laboratory fee is charged for each course with a component laboratory.)

1105 Modern Concepts of Bioscience Laboratory

Prerequisite(s): BIO 1305 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory experiments illustrating modern concepts in the biological sciences, with special emphasis on cell biology and general physiology. (0-3) Taught by: Darrell Vodopich.

1106 Modern Concepts of Bioscience Laboratory

Prerequisite(s): BIO 1306 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory experiments illustrating modern concepts of biological sciences, with emphasis on morphology, genetics, and ecology. (0-3) Taught by: Darrell Vodopich.

1V90 Individual Topics 1 to 9 sem. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and department chair.

For undergraduates who wish to study individual topics not available in formal courses of the department. Directed reading, independent study or research, supervised library, laboratory or fieldwork, or presentation of material. Open to all undergraduates. Prior to registration the student will choose a project, which must be approved by the director. May be repeated once when different topics are studied. Taught by: All Professors

1305 Modern Concepts of Bioscience

An introductory course on the unifying principles common to all levels of biological organization; cell biology and general physiology are emphasized. Required of all biology majors. BIO 1305 is not a prerequisite for BIO 1306. (3-0)

Taught by: Tamarah Adair, Robert Baldridge, Richard Duhrkopf, David Eldridge, Kevin Gutzwiller, Walter Holmes, Owen Lind, Ann Rushing, Mark Taylor, Darrell Vodopich, Marty Harvill

1306 Modern Concepts of Bioscience

A continuation of the study of biological concepts, with emphasis on morphology, genetics, and ecology. Required of all biology majors. (3-0)

Taught by: Tamarah Adair, Robert Baldridge, Richard Duhrkopf, David Eldridge, Kevin Gutzwiller, Walter Holmes, Owen Lind, Ann Rushing, Mark Taylor, Darrell Vodopich, Marty Harvill and Marcie Moehnke.

1401 General Biology

An introductory course on basic life principles of plants, animals, and their environment. The more dynamic aspects are emphasized by field trips and motion pictures. For non-biology majors. (3-2) Taught by: Joseph White

1402 Microbiology

Prerequisite(s): One course in biology and in chemistry or consent of instructor.

A study of the culture, morphology, and activities of representative types of microorganisms and their relation to health. May not be taken for credit by students who take BIO 4401. (3-3) Taught by: Diane Hartman and Tamarah Adair.

1406 Investigations of Modern Biology Concepts II

Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

Introduction to biological concepts with emphasis on morphology, general physiology, evolution, and ecology. Includes field trips and small-group, hypothesis-based projects that will require outside class time. Credit may not be received after receiving credit in BIO 1306 and BIO 1106. Taught by: Marty Harvill

2106 Genetics Laboratory

Prerequisite(s): BIO 2306 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory studies illustrating the principles of genetics in living organisms. (0-3) Taught by: Marcie Moehnke.

2306 Genetics

Basic principles of genetics including Mendelian inheritance, molecular genetics, and population genetics. (3-0) Taught by: W. Keith Hartberg, Marcie Moehnke, Sang-Chul Nam and Richard Duhrkopf

2401 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Prerequisite(s): CHE 1300 or 1301.

An introductory course examining the organization of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis. Topics include basic chemistry and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Emphasis is placed on the integration of systems as they relate to normal health. Designed for students who will pursue a career in nursing, dietetics, and other areas. Will not apply toward requirements needed for a major in biology. (3-3) Taught by: Mark Taylor

2402 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Prerequisite(s): BIO 2401 or consent of instructor.

Continuation of Biology 2401. Topics include metabolism and the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Aspects of development and inheritance are also covered. Will not apply toward requirements needed for a major in biology. (3-3) Taught by: Mark Taylor



Department of Biology