Baylor University
Department of Anthropology
College of Arts and Sciences

Baylor > Anthropology > Faculty & Staff Directory > Carol Macaulay-Jameson, M.A.
Carol Macaulay-Jameson, M.A.

Mrs. Carol F. Macaulay-Jameson
S. Alexander
Lecturer of Anthropology

Mrs. Carol Macaulay-Jameson

MMSCI 262
254-710-6054
Carol_Macaulay@baylor.edu

Lecturer of Anthropology

Education
M.A., Anthropology, Texas A&M, 1998
B.S., Secondary Education, History and Geography, 1975

Major Area of Research
Historical Archaeology in Texas and New Mexico, GIS applications

Current Courses
  • ANT        1305 Introduction to Anthropology
  • ANT/ARC 2302 Emergence World Civilations
  • ANT/ARC 2401 Human Methods of Archaeology/History Scientific                       Techniques
  • ARC        3307 Historical Archaeology
  • ANT        3399 Archaeology of Texas
  • ARC        4101 Seminar Research
Biography

I am a historical archaeologist, interested in small farming and ranching communities in Texas and New Mexico of the late 19th century. I travel county roads, looking for abandoned cemeteries to record. I love old maps, especially those with villages marked on them which no longer exist. I am fascinated with rock art found in rockshelters in the Lower Pecos canyonlands. I experiment with hot-rock cooking and I use ArcGIS in all of my projects. I structure my classes to be hands-on and applicable to real-world archaeology. I believe that it is my responsibility to prepare our students for graduate school or professional employment.

In Historical Archaeology, I expose students to a forgotten 19th- and 20th- century neighborhood that once existed on the land which is now part of the Baylor University campus. Through archival and historical research, the story of this diverse neighborhood is coming to life. Over the past six years, I have led the Baylor Archaeological Field School. In 2006, we worked at an historic German homestead near Fredericksburg. From 2007 through 2010, we conducted excavations at a prehistoric site north of Hamilton and in 2011; we began working in a large rockshelter near Gatesville. The archaeological field school provides students with not only instruction in excavation and laboratory methods, but also in the use of survey equipment and the application of GIS to archaeological data management and analysis. Students complete research projects on some aspect of the field school investigation and most have presented at the Annual Meeting of the Texas Archeological Society. By doing so, they learn that archaeology is not just field work, but involves many hours of processing data and conducting additional research.

Selected Publications

Macaulay, Carol F. , 2003, Historic Site Artifact Analysis. In Hutcheson Ranch Archeological Investigations, 41PR101, 41PR102, 41PR103, by Johnny A. Byers, Principal Investigator, pp. 8-18. Texas Archeology Academy Report. Manuscript on file, library catalog no. AR-TX TAS 06.2003.03, Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, Austin.

Macaulay, Carol, 2003, Historical Legacy of Camp Tahuaya, Boy Scouts of America, Bell County, Texas. Paper presented at the 74th Annual Meeting of the Texas Archeological Society, Fort Worth.

Macaulay, Carol, 2004, The Texas Rock Art Database Project. Paper presented at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Texas Archeological Society, Bryan-College Station.

Parkhill, David, Karen Bell, David Mikulencak, and Carol Macaulay, 2004, Archaeological Survey and Assessment of Spicewood Springs/Camp Tahuaya, BSA, Bell County, Texas. Manuscript on file, library catalog no. AR-TX ParD.01.2004, Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, Austin.

Macaulay, Carol, 2004, The Legend of Elizabeth McKerrow Archaeological, Historical and Archival Investigations of Dobb's Run Ranch (41ED214 and 41ED216). Manuscript on file, Texas Historical Commission, Austin, TX.

Macaulay, Carol, 2012, Late Prehistoric Life Along the Leon Rover in North-Central Texas Archaeological Investigations at the Upper Sprague Site (41HM54) by the 2007-2010 Baylor Archaeological Field Schools. Bulletin of the Texas Archeological Society, in press.