Faculty - Mencken 7-2012


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Meet some of our faculty and learn more about their passion for teaching and devotion to their research.

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Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

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Student image for splashStudents choose Baylor's sociology program for many reasons. Hear from students themselves how academic rigor, accessible faculty and research opportunities prepare them for career in the field or academia.

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Science Blog: Cold but competent: Young whites at elite colleges see Asian-Americans as more competent than other minorities
[2/2/2016]
Jan. 19, 2016
A Baylor University study revealed Asian-Americans to be stereotyped as “cold but competent” on elite college campuses. Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, was a part of the research team. The team wanted to determine whether people commonly perceive Asian-Americans as non-white people who are upwardly mobile because of characteristics that are less evident in other racial minorities. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Atlantic: Do White College Students Believe Stereotypes About Minorities?
[1/27/2016]
Jan. 25, 2016
Jerry Z. Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, is the lead author on research that found that white students at the country’s elite colleges and universities tend to stereotype Asian-Americans as “cold but competent” — and more competent than blacks and Latinos. Park is quoted in the article. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story and arranged the interview. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Education Writers Association: Study: White College Students Buy in to Stereotypes of Minority Peers
[1/26/2016]
Jan. 22, 2016
White students at very selective universities tend to rate Asian-Americans as more competent than blacks or Latinos, according to a Baylor study published in Social Psychology Quarterly. Quoted is lead author Jerry Z. Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. Park notes that many immigrant Asian-Americans are recruited because of their specialized education and skills, but that the stereotype “presumes that this achievement is a result of inherent intelligence and/or competences.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story and arranged the interview. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Science Codex: Young whites at elite colleges see Asian-Americans as more competent than other minorities
[1/22/2016]
Jan. 19, 2016
Article on a Baylor University study that found Asian-Americans tend to be stereotyped as “cold but competent” on elite college campuses. Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, was a part of the research team that wanted to determine whether people commonly perceive Asian-Americans as non-white people who are upwardly mobile because of characteristics that are less evident in other racial minorities. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

MedicalResearch.com: Students at Elite Universities Also View Asians as The Model Minority
[1/21/2016]
Jan. 21, 2016
This article about a Baylor study, which shows that white students at very selective universities tend to rate Asian-Americans than blacks or Latinos, quotes lead author Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Science. Park says study findings about the stereotypes have implications not only for society in general, but for medical clinicians and patients. They might do well to reflect on presumptions they might have about racial groups, he said. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally and arranged this interview. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Charleston Chronicle (Charleston, SC): Young White Students at Elite Colleges See Asian-Americans as More Competent than Blacks & Latinos
[1/21/2016]
Jan. 21, 2016
Racial stereotypes appear to persist at the nation's most prestigious colleges, where white students think their Asian-American peers are "cold but competent" and their black and Latino peers "need to work harder to move up," according to a Baylor study led by Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Houston Chronicle: Study: White students think Asian peers 'more competent' than blacks, Latinos
[1/20/2016]
Jan. 19, 2016
Article about Baylor research led by Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, that found that racial stereotypes appear to persist at the nation's most prestigious colleges, where white students think their Asian-American peers are "cold but competent" and their black and Latino peers "need to work harder to move up." (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty and pitched this research nationally.)
(FULL STORY)

ColorLines Magazine: STUDY: White Students See Asian-Americans as More Competent Than Blacks, Latinos
[1/20/2016]
Jan. 19, 2016
Baylor researchers find that some students at 27 prestigious universities subscribe to stereotypes that can impact everything from the workforce to the voting booth. Quoted is researcher Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

International Business Times: Asian-Americans more competent than other minorities, believe young whites
[1/20/2016]
Jan. 20, 2016
Young white students at elite colleges view Asian-Americans as “cold but competent” — including more competent than blacks and Latinos, according to a Baylor study published in Social Psychology Quarterly. Quoted is researcher Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Young White Students at Elite Colleges View Asian-Americans as More Competent than Blacks and Hispanics, Baylor Study Finds
[1/19/2016]

(FULL STORY)

Children & Nature Network: Is It Pretty Outside? Then You’re Less Likely to Go to Church
[1/13/2016]
Jan. 12, 2016
This article cites a Baylor study, published in the journal Sociology of Religion, which found that U.S. counties with nicer weather and prettier natural surroundings see lower rates of religious affiliation. Quoted is study co-author Todd Ferguson, a sociology doctoral candidate. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally in August 2015. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Religion Dispatches: Oprah, Terrorist Cells, And The Meaning Of Life: An Interview With Paul Froese
[1/7/2016]
Jan. 6, 2016
In this Q&A about his new book, “On Purpose: How We Create The Meaning of Life,” Paul Froese, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor's College of Arts & Sciences, explains how he used “social theory and survey data to explore how people derive meaningfulness from their lives.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers faculty and research in the sociology department.)
(FULL STORY)

Atlanta Magazine: Worship workout: Atlantans combine faith and fitness
[1/7/2016]
Jan. 7, 2016
A study conducted by Todd W. Ferguson, doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, is mentioned in this article about faith and fitness. Ferguson's research found that “more than a third of all U.S. clergy, from any religion or denomination, are obese.” Ferguson said, “Pastors are an integral part of the most intimate aspects of community life — marriages, deaths, births — and these often entail food.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research nationally in January 2015. She covers faculty and research in the sociology department.)
(FULL STORY)

Christianity Today: Surprise Change in How Multiethnic Churches Affect Race Views
[12/9/2015]
Dec. 2, 2015
This article about how congregations view racial inequality quotes Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., an associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, about a study he co-authored. The research found that 72 percent of African-Americans in predominantly black churches believe that the reasons for racial inequality are structural, rather than an individual’s lack of motivation. But only about half of African-Americans in multiracial churches believe that same thing. Instead of the predominantly white majority changing its views, Dougherty said, “it appears that African-Americans (in multiracial congregations) start to think more like whites about the origins of inequality.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story and arranged the interview. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Relevant Magazine: Be Known for What You’re For, Not Just What You’re Against
[11/4/2015]
Nov. 4, 2015
Article about whether evangelicals are winning people for Christ by perpetuating the “God is anti-(fill-in-the-blank) message in the larger media. Cited is research from the first wave (2006) of the Baylor Religion Survey by Paul Froese, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor's College of Arts & Sciences, and former Baylor sociologist Christopher Bader, Ph.D., which concluded that people look at God in four different ways: authoritative, benevolent, distant and critical. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Conversation: Homeschooled children do not grow up to be more religious
[10/2/2015]
Oct. 1, 2015
According to research by Jeremy Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, the key factor in transferring religious commitment is the level of religiosity of the parents and not the schooling a child received, discrediting the theory that homeschooled children grow up to be more religious than young people who attended public or private schools.
(FULL STORY)


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