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Judicial Affairs
Student Conduct Administration

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Baylor > Judicial Affairs > Frequently Asked Questions > Preliminary Meeting



Preliminary Meeting

1. Where do I go for my preliminary conduct hearing?
2. What will happen during the preliminary conduct hearing with Judicial Affairs?
3. Can I bring an advisor, such as a parent or lawyer, to my preliminary conduct hearing?
4. Since I am not under oath during the preliminary conduct hearing, I cannot be charged with perjury, right?
5. Even if I am not responsible for the misconduct, is it not easier to just admit to the violation and get it over with?
6. What is my best option if I am responsible for the alleged misconduct?
7. If I admit to a violation, will this not ruin my chances of going to professional or graduate school or from getting a job!




Preliminary Meeting

1. Where do I go for my preliminary conduct hearing?
All preliminary conduct hearings are held in the Judicial Affairs office, which is located in Clifton Robinson Tower suite 270. You should schedule an appointment by calling the Judicial Affairs office at 254-710-1715.

2. What will happen during the preliminary conduct hearing with Judicial Affairs?
You will meet with a Student Conduct officer. You will be asked to explain what happened from your point of view. The Student Conduct officer will ask you follow-up questions so he or she may develop a clear understanding of what occurred. The important thing to remember is to tell the truth.

3. Can I bring an advisor, such as a parent or lawyer, to my preliminary conduct hearing?
A parent, lawyer, or even a friend may accompany you to the Judicial Affairs office. However, only the Student Conduct officer and the accused student may attend the preliminary conduct hearing to admit or deny the charge. You may talk with your advisor and the Student Conduct officer BEFORE the actual preliminary conduct hearing.

4. Since I am not under oath during the preliminary conduct hearing, I cannot be charged with perjury, right?
Perjury is lying under oath, so Judicial Affairs cannot charge you with perjury. However, lying is a form of misconduct stated in the Baylor University Student Conduct Code. If it is determined that you lied in your preliminary conduct hearing or in a hearing, you could face additional charges resulting in the sanction of suspension or expulsion depending on the severity of your dishonesty and misconduct. Please keep in mind that most lies do not hold up well under scrutiny, even if several people are trying to cover each other. By telling the truth, you don't have to worry about keeping your story straight.

5. Even if I am not responsible for the misconduct, is it not easier to just admit to the violation and get it over with?
No, there is no purpose served in sanctioning a student who did not violate a policy. We do not recommend falsely admitting to a violation. All we ask is that students be completely honest in the process. This is a fundamental ethical principle and students are expected to live up to this standard.

6. What is my best option if I am responsible for the alleged misconduct?
Your best option is to tell the complete truth. We know that it is not easy to admit mistakes, but having enough courage and personal integrity to admit your mistake is the first indication that you have already learned something. Telling the truth will not eliminate the consequences that will result from the misconduct; however, not telling the truth in order to misrepresent the incident can result in greater consequences. In short, if you are wrong, admit it, learn from it, and move forward.

7. If I admit to a violation, will this not ruin my chances of going to professional or graduate school or from getting a job!
A primary goal of Judicial Affairs is to "restore the offender" by helping students learn from their mistakes. Disciplinary records are confidential and generally cannot be released to others without the student's written consent. Disciplinary records are kept separate from Academic records.

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